News

Nearly 100 Conclusions on the Health Effects of Marijuana and Cannabis-Derived Products Presented in New Report

January 12, 2017

A new report from the National Academies offers one of the most comprehensive studies of recent research on the health impacts of cannabis and cannabis-derived products – such as marijuana and active chemical compounds known as cannabinoids – ranging from their therapeutic effects to their risks for causing certain cancers, diseases, mental health disorders, and injuries. The committee also proposed ways to expand and improve the quality of cannabis research efforts, enhance data collection efforts to support the advancement of research, and address the current barriers to cannabis research. Read more

New Report Examines Challenges Faced by the Federal Statistical System

January 12, 2017

A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine examines the challenges faced by the federal statistical system, discusses the opportunities and risks of using government and private sector data sources, and outlines steps needed to lay the foundation for a new paradigm that would combine diverse data sources in a secure manner to enhance the collection and use of federal statistics.

Report Recommends New Framework for Estimating the Social Cost of Carbon Dioxide

January 11, 2017

To estimate the social cost of carbon dioxide for use in regulatory impact analyses, the federal government should use a new framework that would strengthen the scientific basis, provide greater transparency, and improve characterization of the uncertainties of the estimates, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report also identifies a number of near- and longer-term improvements that should be made for calculating the social cost of carbon. Read More 

New Report Identifies Root Causes of Health Inequity in the U.S., Outlines Solutions for Communities to Advance Health Equity

January 11, 2017

The burdens of poor health and the benefits of good health and well-being are inequitably distributed in the U.S. due to factors that range from poverty and inadequate housing to structural racism and discrimination, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Community-driven interventions targeting these factors hold the greatest promise for promoting health equity -- the state in which everyone has the opportunity to attain full health potential and no one is disadvantaged from achieving this potential because of social position or any other socially defined circumstance. Read More 

Accounting for Social Risk Factors in Medicare Payment

January 10, 2017

The National Academies released the fifth and final report in a series examining social risk factors that affect the health outcomes of Medicare beneficiaries and how to account for these factors in Medicare value-based payment programs. The report says that accounting for social risk factors in quality measurement and payment in combination with complementary approaches may achieve the policy goals of reducing disparities in access, quality, and outcomes, as well as quality improvement and efficient care delivery for all patients – thereby promoting health equity.

New Report Finds Significant Improvements in Methods to Collect Data on Recreational Fishing

January 10, 2017

A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine says the Marine Recreational Information Program – a national survey program – has made significant improvements in gathering information on recreational fishing through redesigned surveys, strengthening the quality of data. Although many of the major recommendations from a previous Academies report have been addressed, some challenges remain, such as incorporating technological advances for data collection and enhancing communication with anglers and some other stakeholders. Read More

World's Largest Gathering of Transportation Professionals

January 6, 2017

More than 13,000 people from about 70 countries -- including policymakers, administrators, practitioners, and researchers from government, industry, and academia -- will gather Jan. 8-12 for the Transportation Research Board 96th Annual Meeting. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx will be among the featured speakers.

New Report Reviews Eight NASA Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks

January 6, 2017

NASA asked the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to review more than 30 publicly available evidence reports on human health risks for long-duration and exploration space flight. A new letter report -- the fourth in the series of five -- examines eight NASA evidence reports on topics including astronauts' risk of developing cardiovascular disease from radiation exposure; cancer from radiation exposure; radiation syndromes from intense exposure to high doses of radiation over short time periods; central nervous system effects from radiation exposure; adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders; and performance decrements and adverse health outcomes from sleep loss, circadian desynchronization, and work overload. The NASA evidence reports are available to download here.

New Report Calls for Revisions to WIC Program

January 5, 2017

A new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine proposes updated revisions to the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) to better align with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, promote and support breast-feeding, and improve flexibility for cultural preferences. The committee that carried out the study and wrote the report recommended cost-neutral changes that include adding fish; increasing the amount of whole grains; and increasing vegetables and fruits as a trade-off for decreasing juice, milk, legumes, peanut butter, infant vegetables and fruits, and infant meats. It also recommended allowing women to receive the quantity of formula needed to support any level of breast-feeding. The proposed changes will save approximately $220 million programwide from 2018 to 2022. Read More

New Report Calls for Use of Emerging Scientific Data to Better Assess Public Health Risks

January 5, 2017

Recent scientific and technological advances have the potential to improve assessment of public health risks posed by chemicals, yet questions remain how best to integrate the findings from the new tools and methods into risk assessment. A new National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report recommends approaches for using 21st century science to evaluate the many factors that lead to health risks and disease, laying the groundwork for a new direction in risk assessment that acknowledges the complexity of disease causation. Read More | Webinar on Friday, Jan. 6, beginning at 2 p.m. EST

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