National Academy of Engineering Annual Meeting Begins

Oct. 2, 2015

Oct. 2 – NAE members will gather on Oct. 4-5 in Washington, D.C., to congratulate new members and welcome distinguished speakers who will discuss this year’s annual meeting theme, the Grand Challenges for Engineering. Agenda | Learn More

Airport X-ray Screening Systems Comply With Health and Safety Standards for Radiation Exposure

Sept. 29, 2015

Machines that use advanced X-ray imaging technology to screen airport passengers comply with radiation exposure limits set by the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report also finds that the machines adhere to the recommended safety mechanisms described in the ANSI/HPS standards to prevent overexposure to radiation in the event of a mechanical failure or deliberate tampering. Read More

New Report Recommends Streamlining, Harmonizing Regulations for Federally Funded Research

Sept. 22, 2015

Continuing expansion of federal research regulations and requirements is diminishing the effectiveness of the U.S. scientific enterprise by directing investigators' time away from research and toward administrative matters, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report identifies specific actions Congress, the White House, federal agencies, and research institutions should take to reduce the regulatory burden. Read More

Urgent Change Needed to Improve Diagnosis

Sept. 22, 2015

Most people will experience at least one diagnostic error -- an inaccurate or delayed diagnosis -- in their lifetime, sometimes with devastating consequences, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The committee that conducted the study and wrote the report found that although getting the right diagnosis is a key aspect of health care, efforts to improve diagnosis and reduce diagnostic errors have been quite limited.

Report Finds Immigrants Come to Resemble Native-Born Americans Over Time, But Integration Not Always Linked to Greater Well-Being for Immigrants

Sept. 21, 2015

As immigrants and their descendants become integrated into U.S. society, many aspects of their lives improve, including measurable outcomes such as educational attainment, occupational distribution, income, and English language ability, but their well-being declines in the areas of health, crime, and family patterns, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. At the same time, several factors impede immigrants' integration into society, such as their legal status, racial disparities in socio-economic outcomes, and low naturalization rates.

New Report Examines Implications of Growing Gap in Life Span by Income for Entitlement Programs

Sept. 17, 2015

As the gap in life expectancy between the highest and lowest earners in the U.S. has widened over time, high earners have disproportionately received larger lifetime benefits from government programs such as Social Security and Medicare, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report looked at life expectancy patterns among a group of Americans born in 1930 and compared those with projections for a group born in 1960.

Chinese Academy of Sciences and Royal Society to Join in Convening International Summit on Human Gene Editing; Organizing Committee Named

Sept. 14, 2015

The Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society (the science academy of the U.K.) are joining the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Medicine in co-hosting an international summit on human gene editing to be held Dec. 1-3 in Washington, D.C. An organizing committee has been appointed to develop an agenda for the summit, which will bring together experts from a variety of disciplines to discuss scientific, medical, ethical, and governance issues associated with advances in human gene-editing research. Read More

Chad Mirkin Awarded First NAS Prize in Convergence Research

Sept. 10, 2015

Chad A. Mirkin is the inaugural recipient of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Prize in Convergence Research, the National Academy of Sciences announced today. A professor at Northwestern University and the director of its International Institute for Nanotechnology, Mirkin is being awarded the $400,000 prize "for impressively integrating chemistry, materials science, molecular biology, and biomedicine in the development of spherical nucleic acids that are widely used in the rapid and automated diagnosis of infectious diseases and many other human diseases -- including cancers and cardiac disease -- and in the detection of drug-resistant bacteria."

Stuff Matters: Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World Wins Best Book Award From Academies; Particle Fever, Your Inner Fish, Detroit News, Reuters Also Take Prizes

Sept. 9, 2015

The recipients of the 2015 Communication Awards were announced today by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Supported by the W.M. Keck Foundation since 2003 as part of the Keck Futures Initiative, these prestigious awards — each of which includes a $20,000 prize — recognize excellence in reporting and communicating science, engineering, and medicine to the general public. The winners will be honored during a ceremony on Oct. 14 in Washington, D.C. Read More

Rise in Federal Disability Benefits for Children With Mental Disorders Consistent With General Population

Sept. 9, 2015

The percentage of poor children who received federal disability benefits for at least one of 10 major mental disorders increased from 1.88 percent in 2004 to 2.09 percent in 2013, and such growth is consistent with and proportionate to trends in the prevalence of diagnosed mental disorders among children in the general U.S. population, says a new report of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The increase also is not unexpected. This is because a sizeable number of low-income children with disabling mental disorders do not receive federal benefits, yet are eligible for such benefits. Read More

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